Monday, February 25, 2008

About Jollywood -- Assamese Cinema

Noted director Bhabendra Nath Saikia during film shooting

Noted director Bhabendra Nath Saikia receiving award from President of India
Bhabendra Nath Saikia during film shooting




Noted Film maker Jahnu Baruah
Moloya Goswami receiving theNational best actress award from President of India









The origin of Assamese Cinema can be traced back to the dreams and imagination of a revolutionary visionary Rupkonwar Jyotiprasad Agarwala, who was also a distinguished poet, playwright, composer and freedom fighter. He was instrumental in the production of the first Assamese Film “Joymati”, under the banner of Critrakala Movietone. Due to the lack of trained technicians, Jyotiprasad, while making his maiden film, had to shoulder the added responsibilities as the script writer, producer, director, choreographer, editor, set and costume designer, lyricist and music director. The film, completed with a budget of Rupees Sixty thousand and was released on March 10th, 1935. The picture failed miserably. It is unfortunate that like so many early Indian films , the negatives and complete prints of Joymati are missing. Not withstanding the failure of his venture, Jyotiprasad made another film after a lapse of two years titled “Indramalati(1939)”. It was his second and last film. The eminent composer and singer of Assam Dr. Bhupen Hazarika, played a stellar role in the play. With the passing away of Jyotiprasad, the Assamese film scene witnessed a temporary lull for about a couple of years. But things changed with the onset of war, Taking advantage of this, the Late Rohini Kr. Baruah made a film on a relevant historical topic called “Manomati (1941)”. It was followed by films like Parvati Baruah's Rupahi (1946), Kamal Narayan choudhury's Badan Barphukan (1947), Phani Sharma's Sjiraj, Asit Sen's Biplabi, Prabin Phukan's Parghat Suresh Goswami's Runumi etc.
But the most remarkable film of the fifties was Piyali Phukan which went on to win a National award. In 1955, a new talent Nip Barua made his directorial debut with Smrit Paras. His subsequent films Mak Aaru Moram and Ranga Police bagged many state awards and the silver medal at the national level. Dr. Bhupen Hazarika also produced and directed his first film Era Batur Sur. Prabhat Mukherjee made a film on the universality of mother-hood, Puberan (1959).,which was shown in The Berlin Film Festival. The next memorable production was Lachit Borphukan by Sarbeswar Chakraborty. Dr. Bhupen Hazarika made his unforgettable musical lore Shakuntala (1961) which proved equally successful with critics and the press. It also won president's silver medal. Following this, a chain of films went into regular production and got released which included Nip Barua's Narakasur, Anil Choudhury's Matri Swarga, Brojen Barua's Itu Setu Bahuto and Mukta & Anwar Hussain's Tejmala.

By the middle of the sixties, film were produced in Assam on a regular basis. It should also be mentioned here that between 1935 ad to 1970 a total of 62 films were produced. Besides the film makers already referred to, many others engaged in film making during the period included Pravin Sharma, Saila Barua, Abdul Mazid, Amar Pathak, Indukal Pattazarika, Diben Barua, Debkumar Basu, Amulya Manna, Gauri Barman, Atul Bardoloi, Sujit Singh, Nalin Duara and Prafulla Barua.

During the period of 1970-82 a total of 57 Assamese films were made. New directors started emerging on the horizon. Samarendra Narayan Deb's Aranya (1970), Kamal Choudhury's Bhaity (1972) the first colour film of Assam, Manoranjan Sur's Uttaran (1973), Deuti Barua's Bristi (1974) Pulok Gogoi Khoj (1974) Padam Barua's Ganga Chilanir Pakhi (1976) and Dr. Bhabendranath Saikia's Sandhya Rag (1977) and Atul Bordoloi's Kollol (1978) are films worth - mentioning.

The outstanding directors of contemporary Assamese Cinema are

Jahnu Baruah (Aparoopa, Papori, Haladhia Choraye Baodhan Khai, Banani, Firingoti, Hkhagoroloi Bohu Door) ;

Sanjeev Hazarika (Haladhar, Meemanxa);

Bhabendaranatha Saikia (Anirbaan, Agnisnaan, Sarothi, Kolahol, Abartan, Itihaas, Kaal Sandhya) Dr. Santwana Bordoloi (Adajya) and

Bidyut Chakraborty (Rag Birag).

Their Films have won National & International Awards.
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First Cinema Hall
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Jonaki Cinema Hall, Tezpur-It is the first cinema hall to be established anywhere in Assam. It was established by Roop Konwar Jyoti Prasad Agarwala. It was set up to screen the first Assamese feature film Joymati in circa 1940.


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Assamesse Classic Movies

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Joymoti- The first assamese movie- Joymoti, directed by Jyoti Prasad Agarwalla was released in the year 1935.
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Joymoti : The first radical film of India
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In the history of Indian cinema are a few filmmakers who, by virtue of their creative ability, intense labour and extraordinary perseverance, have come to be considered genius. D G Phalke, V Shantaram, Pramathes Barua, Himansu Roy, Ritwik Ghatak, Satyajit Ray are some such figures. Traveling through the little roads of Assam, we find another member of that pantheon: Jyotiprasad Agarwalla (1903-51), one of the greatest cultural figures to have been produced by the state. He made only two films, far less than other filmmakers, yet with his first film alone he could be distinguished as a radical auteur of all India. Nevertheless, he is little known.
Joymoti, released in 1935, added a new chapter in the chronicles of Indian cinema, primarily in the discourse of realism. Further, Jyotiprasad was the only political filmmaker of pre-independent India, though there were many in post-independent India, starting with Ritwik Ghatak. Above all else, Joymoti is a nationalist film in its attempts to create a cultural world using the elements of Assamese society. It is the only work of its kind of that period.
Biographers of Jyotiprasad Agarwalla are often mystified with the diversity of his interests. From a playwright in his mid-teens, to a popular dramatist, to a newspaper editor; first a student of law, then of music; composing tunes originally by blending local and Western music, later writing revolutionary poems and songs; writing children’s literature, then art criticism, then intellectual essays. Jyotiprasad established a makeshift studio to make the first Assamese feature film, and later transformed the space into a cultural centre dedicated to the causes of the people. He organised a volunteer force for M K Gandhi’s Salt March; he was labelled by the imperial government as an absconder, surrendered, and was imprisoned twice. He joined in the Communist-led uprising of 1942; he resigned from a government body in order to protest the compulsory contribution by the government to the World War II effort; he was president of the first India People’s Theatre Association conference in Assam. The list is endless. One constant remains throughout, however: politics was inseparable from Jyotiprasad’s works, whether in poetry or drama, dance or theatre, music or moving image. Throughout his varied career, we see the same conscientious artist striving to express himself in aesthetic terms – with a worldview of his own, immersed in deep love for Assamese literature and culture.

The making of the film Joymoti is remarkable on many counts, yet two things are particularly striking. First was the form of the constructed imagery that discarded norms of Indian cinema (read: ‘faded photocopy of spicy Hollywood’) that had been prevalent since its birth in 1912. Second was the director’s inflexible determination in achieving the concept of that form in the truest possible way. These two intertwined, complimentary aspects cannot be discussed separately. For revealing the natural life of a particular region of Assam, Jyotiprasad decided he would have to develop his own style rather than import elements from elsewhere. Established actors are far removed from the types of characters essential for a lifelike portrayal; studios based in other parts of the country are either too busy producing films for mass consumption, or too incapable of feeling the pulse of the alien concepts espoused by Jyotiprasad.

Jyotiprasad wished to follow the doctrine of cinematic realism as expressed by the Russian filmmaker Lev Kuleshov (although back then, the term in vogue was ‘innovative cinema’). Kuleshov demanded that all things theatrical be banished from films, so as to make way for the aesthetic value of documentary truth, montage and real-life material. His ideas of a new film culture were founded as per changes that had occurred in the Soviet Union after the revolution in 1917. Jyotiprasad came across these ideas while studying in London. He was a visitor to the German government-founded UFA studio in Berlin for six months. There, he took up the idea of ‘innovative cinema’, as something capable of embracing the spirit of anti-colonial uprising in India. For his active role in the non-cooperation movement against the British, he had been officially declared an absconder prior to his journey to the West. For him, there was no question: only now could a new culture begin.

The content of Joymoti is also innovative: a widely popular legend of a 17th century princess of the Ahom dynasty who died of the torture meted out by a puppet king. Joymoti had remained silent about her husband, who had fled the state and whom the king had wanted to kill as a competitor of the throne. The oppression and passive resistance of the film’s story paralleled the situations prevalent in India during 1930s British rule. Thus, the realistic depiction in the film was a political approach, contradicting the theatrical style of acting, costume and sets, which at the time were the dominant features of Indian films. Cinematic content of productions in other Indian regions were also overtly religious, based on mythology. Contrary to such films, Joymoti was based on real historical materials – although history books are silent about a particular lady named Joymoti.

Assamese studio
While Jyotiprasad pursued Kuleshov’s ideas on filmmaking, he increasingly wanted the culture of film to take hold in Assam. He was perfectly capable of organising financing that could have allowed him to shoot his film in any major studio in Calcutta or Pune, but his ideology barred him from doing so. The idea subsequently arose of establishing his own studio in Assam. Jyotiprasad was deeply sceptical about any misrepresentation of the traditional culture of his land. He also felt that, as cinema had already attained worldwide popularity, without a filmmaking centre the people of Assam would lag behind culturally.

The studio in Bholaguri was a large concrete platform, with open-air enclosures of bamboo mats and banana plants. It used the sun as its only source of light. Jyotiprasad floated newspaper advertisements for actors and actresses, mentioning brief outlines of the film and descriptions of the characters. His idea was to get ‘types’ for his characters, not seasoned artists, even offering remunerations for successful candidates. One of his preconditions was that potential actors needed to be from ‘respectable’ family backgrounds, as opposed to those from red-light areas that had been used during the 1930s in Calcutta. After a prolonged search and detailed interviews, he brought together the chosen ones to acquaint them with his characters as well as with the techniques of filmmaking, with an eye towards establishing a film industry in Assam. Few of them had ever even seen a film. He sought out a trio, Bhupal Shankar Mehta and the Faizi Brothers, from Lahore as cameraman and sound-recordists. He brought to Guwahati those individuals who were still fresh and yet to be weighed down by the commercially-dominant Hindustani cinema (the term Jyotiprasad used in his writings), whose hub at that time was in Lahore, across the expanse of the Brahmaputra, Ganga and Indus plains, in Punjab.
Jyotiprasad designed the set using bamboo hats and mats, deer and buffalo horns, Naga spears, and other traditional materials. A museum-like property room was also created, where the director culled traditional costumes, ornaments and handicrafts for the set’s decor. For developing film, ice was brought from Calcutta by steamer, train and automobile. Joymoti might have allowed Jyotiprasad to project the political values of the ‘Assamese’ screen-images. But compared to the works of other filmmaking regions of undivided India, it was a disaster in terms of technical quality – particularly sound. The cheap battery-operated sound-recording system chartered from Lahore turned out to be quite inadequate, which he found out only at the editing table in Lahore during ‘post-production’. With limited money, he could not return to Assam for re-recording. In that part of then-India, there was no possibility of getting another Assamese-speaking person. Finding no other option, Jyotiprasad accepted the default output and dubbed about thirty characters with his own voice, including those of the female characters.

Back home, there existed just two cinema houses in the then-undivided Assam, in Guwahati and Shillong. These were highly inadequate to ensure a return on his investments. He proceeded to build a movie theatre for himself in Tezpur, and arranged a number of itinerant shows around the state. People turned out in large numbers to witness the marvel of Assamese moving images, besides paying homage to the legendary protagonist namesake. Nonetheless, the audience failed to appreciate its merits, partially due to naiveté in recognising the film’s realistic approach.
Although he had been an heir to his family fortune, Joymoti left Jyotiprasad bankrupt. Despite his pre-eminence, he was never a representative of the film trade, nor was he able to change the course of mainstream filmmaking. Four years later, in 1939, he made his second and last film, Indramalati. It was shot in a Calcutta studio with an eye towards the box-office. Although he was able to recoup his original productions costs, proceeds from Joymoti never materialised, and Jyotiprasad shuttered his studio thereafter.

Regional realism
Discussions about realism in Indian cinema (here confined to ‘nationalist’ and socially conscious films that have been regarded as landmark Indian works) usually start with four films made within a four-year period prior to 1947. They are Bimal Roy’s Udayer Pathe (1944) and its remake, Humrahi (1945), Chetan Anand’s Neecha Nagar (1945), and K A Abbas’ Dharti Ke Lal (1946). After Independence, this list would include Bimal Roy’s Do Bigha Zamin (1953) and Satyajit Ray’s Pather Pachali (1955), this last of which opened a new discourse on ‘regional reality’.

With the exception of Pather Pachali, this list includes several dominant themes and oppositions: the struggles between the haves and have-nots, the country and the city, and the tenant or peasant and the landlord or moneylender. In format, the films are characteristic in turning to Hollywood as a model – although this dynamic still takes place within the Bombay mode of production. There are no radical stylistic departures in demand for realism. The actors in these films were mostly established stars, although studios tried to refashion them as ‘common’ men and women.

Jyotiprasad Agarwalla’s Joymoti has yet to figure in discussions related to realism and Indian cinema. This oversight may be partly due to the film having been made in a marginal-language area, and partly due to non-circulation of the film since its release in 1935. When compared with those films listed above, Joymoti appears as perhaps the most pioneering work in depicting realism in Indian cinema – both in concept, and in the persistence in realising that concept. Even the phrase ‘regional reality’, which has been used for Pather Pachali, perhaps could be redefined by going back to this work of Jyotiprasad’s.

Joymoti may also be seen as India’s first feminist film. Three of the film’s female characters – Joymoti herself, her close friend Seuti, and the king’s mother – were against the royal court’s politics. Although they were not vocal in their disagreement, their tactical and silent protests are quite noteworthy. Furthermore, viewers see a host of women joining them, all of which are unusually realistic female depictions. Indian cinematic women were otherwise painted as mother, goddess, vamp, prostitute, hunterwali, et al – full of grace, beauty and seduction (See Himal Nov-Dec 2005, “’She’ and the Silver Screen”). Jyotiprasad’s care in his depictions of his female protagonists can be traced from his very first play, written at the age of 14. Throughout his subsequent decades of playwriting, there is one binding commonality through his plays: the critical hand that the female characters have in determining the stories’ major events. After Joymoti, however, the Indian woman would have to wait until the 1950s to appear in her full, real form on movie screens of the Subcontinent.

It is not appropriate to say that Jyotiprasad Agarwalla of Assam needs to be re-discovered by the world of Southasian cinema, because he was never discovered in the first place. It is time, in the rush of today’s Hindi/Hindustani film world to embrace the world market, to look back at an unsung director who was a true pioneer of realism. It is even possible that digging so far into the past will inform current media practitioners in a way that their own future works may steer closer to reality, and away from the frivolity to which many seem to have succumbed.
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Rupahi- The fourth assamese movie Rupahi, produced & directed by Parbati Prashad Baruah was released in 1946. Screenplay, dialogue lyrics and even the music of the movie was composed by Parbati Prasad Baruah himself.

Siraj- Siraj is another remarkable Assamese Movie- directed by Phani Sarmah. Siraj is the sixth assamese movie released in 1948. The film speaks about the unity among the people of Hindu and Muslim community. Bishnu Rabha and Phani Sarmah, inspired by the story named ‘Siraj’ written by Lakshidhar Sarmah prepared the screenplay and dialogue of the movie. The outdoor shots were taken around Tezpur, the indoors being shot in Kali Film studio, Kolkata. The lead role Siraj was played by Phani Sarmah himself. Music was composed by Bishnu Rabha. Bhupen Hazarika and Shiva Bhattacharyya assisted him.

Era Bator Sur- Era Bator Sur is the first film of Dr. Bhupen Hazarika. The film was released in 1956. Dr. Bhupen Hazarika was then an active member of Indian people’s. Theater Association and in the fifties almost all the workers of I. P. T. A. were influenced by the sorrow and happiness, struggle and hope of the common mass and made themselves associated with creative works related to folk music and culture of the common assamese people. Era Bator Sur was also a result of one such effort. The story and the music of Era Bator Sur reflects the emotional rising of the people of that era. The theme of this movie is based on characters belonging to tea labourers society of Assam. The exploitations carried out by one class of the society also finds importance in the movie. Dr. Bhupen Hazarika is also the music director of the movie. The cast of the movie includes Phani Sarmah, Bishnu Rabha, Balraj Sahni along with Bijoy Shankar, Iva Asau, Tassaduk Yusuf etc.

Puberun- The first assamese film screened in an international Film Festival is Puberun. Directed by Prabhat Mukherjee of Kolkatta and released in 1959 the film was screened in ‘Berlin Film Festival’, 1960 and bought laurels to the state of Assam. Heroine of the movie Gyanada Kakoti was also present during the screening of the film in Berlin.

The story is based on mother-child relationship and the truth that every child of this world is equal. Another remarkable feature of this film is that "Margaret Anderson" of London Dramatic school acted in this film. In the history of Assamese Cinema this was for the first time that an actress from England, acted in an assamese film.The role of the mother was played boldly by Gyanada Kakoti and against her was Tassaduck Yusuf . Music was by Tarikuddin Ahmed . Puberun even won the Presidents Award.

Saknoiya- Saknoiya is the only film directed by Soilo Baruah. The film got released in the month of November, 1959. Story, screenplay and dialogue was written by Durgeswar Barthakur. The indoor shots of this movie took place in Indrapuri Studio, Kolkatta. The editing of this film was also done in Kolkatta.
The story revolves round the emotions of two brothers, one a taxi driver and another a high official in a government office who marries a lady who would not agree to reside together with a taxi driver. The actors include Gyanada Kakoti, Bina Baruah, Tulsi Das, Sorbeswar Chakravarty, Bina Das, Soilo Baruah, Anil Das, Durgeswar Barthakur, Saityen Choudhury etc. Mukul Baruah was the music director.

Doctor Bezbaruah - Brojen Baruah’s Doctor Bejbaruah released in the year 1960, marked the beginning of success of so called commercial movies in Assamese Film industy. Following the footsteps of Doctor Bejbaruah directors / produces got encouragement to make commercially hit movies in later days of Assamese Cinema.

Though this film laid the base of the commercial value of a movie, yet it put a question mark on making movies based on the simple life of Assamese village folk.
Dr. Bezbaruah was the first Assamese thriller movie and also for the first time the outdoor and indoor shooting entirely took place in various locations of Assam.


Gonga Silonir Pakhi - Gonga Silonir Pakhi, directed and produced by Padum Baruah and released in 1976, is one of remarkable assamese movies released till date. The music was also composed by Padum Baruah himself. Renown novelist Dr. Lakhminandan Bora wrote the main story, screenplay was by Padum Baruah. The story is based on the simple life of the villagers of Assam.

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First in Assamese film

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1First film maker of Assamese film Jyoti Prasad Agarwal

2 First Assamese film director Pramathesh Baruah, He Directed the Bengali film “Devadash” in 1934.

3 First director of an Assamese film Jyoti Prasad Agarwala; he directed “Joymati”. The film was released at Raonak Cinema (now Jyoti Cinema), Kolkata on 10th March 1935 and in the same year on 20th March at Kumar Bhaskar Natya Mandir, Guwahati.

4 First dubbed film in India Joymati (1935)

5 First Assamese actor to act in a Bengali Movie Pramathesh Baruah. He acted in “Taki Kini Gulam” in 1930.

6 First Full length comedy movie in Assamese film "Ito Sito Bahuto", Director was Brajen Barua.The film was released in 1963.

7 First film with actor from outside of Assam "Era Batar Sur", released in 1956.Balraj Sahani acted in this film as a guest appearance. Dr. Bhupen Hazarika was the director.

8 First Assamese partly coloured movie Shakuntala, released in 1961.The film was directed by Dr. Bhupen Hazarika.

9 First Colour movie Bhaity (1972), Director was Kamalnarayan Choudhury.

10 First Assamese film dubbed from Hindi Bhagya (1968).

11 First Assamese thriller "Dr. Bezbaruah" (1969), Directed by Brajen Baruah.

12 First Assamese film where a non Assamese singer sang a full song "Era Batar Sur"; here legendary singer of Indian Music Lata Mangeskar sang a song under the music direction of Dr. Bhupen Hazarika.

13 First Assamese film to be screened in a foreign land 'Puberun' (1959). It was screened in Berlin. Director was Prabhat Mukherjee.

14 First Long playing record of an Assamese Film "Chik-mik Bijuli" (1969), directed by Dr. Bhupen Hazarika.

15 First Assamese film to receive a national award "Piyali Phukan", this film received the Repute Certificate of Merit. Directed by Phani Sharma.
16 First adult movie "Marichika" (1972); directed by Amulya Manna.

17 First adult movie which was released "Hridayar Prayojan" (1972), directed by Gauri Barman.

18 First movie broadcast in Doordarshan 'Bristi' (1974), directed by Deuti Baruah.

19 First movie screened in Indian panorama 'Sandhyarag' (1977), directed by Dr. Bhabendranath Saikia.

20 First Eastman colour movie 'Ajali Nabou' (1980), directed by Nip Baruah.

21 First lady director Suprabha Devi, she directed 'Nayanmani' in 1983.

22 First Assamese cinema scope movie 'Jeevan Surabhi' (1984), directed by Naresh Kumar.

23 First movie to get best screen play award in national level 'Agnisnan' (1985), Directed by Dr. Bhabendranath Saikia.

24 First film to receive Swarna Kamal award 'Haladhiya Charaye Baodhan Khaay' (1987), directed by Jahnu Baruah.
25 First children movie Abuj Bedana (1993), directed by Gunasindhu Hazarika.
26 First film which was screened as an Inaugural movie of the Indian panorama Rag Birag (1996), directed by Bidyut Chakrabarty.

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National & International Awards (Assamese Films):
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1955 Piyoli Phukan President's Certificate of Merit

1957 Maak Aru Maram President's Certificate of Merit

1958 Rangaa Police President's Silver Award

1959 Puberun President's Silver Award

1961 Shakuntala President's Silver Award

1963 Tejimola President's Certificate of Merit

1963 Maniram Dewan President's Silver Award

1964 Pratiddhani President's Silver Award

1966 Latighati President's Silver Award

1969 Dr.Bezbaruah National award- Best Regional Film

1971 Aranya National award- Best Regional Film

1972 Upaja Sonar Maati National award- Best Regional Film

1973 Mamata National award- Best Regional Film

1975 Chameli Memsaab National award- Best Regional Film

1976 Putala Ghar National award- Best Regional Film

1977 Sandhyaraag National award- Best Regional Film

1978 Kallol National award- Best Regional Film

1981 Anirban National award- Best Regional Film

1982 Aparupa National award- Best Regional Film

1983 Alokar Aahban National award- Best Regional Film

1984 Son Maina National award- Best Regional Film

1985 Agnisnan National award- Best Regional Film

1986 Baan National award- Best Regional Film

1986 Aalayaran (Bodo) National award- Best Regional Film

1987 Pratham Raagini National award- Best Regional Film

1987 Haaladhiya Charaye Bawdhan Khaai National award- Best Film, Second Best Film ( Locarno Interntl. Film Festival )

1989 Kolahal National award- Best Regional Film

1990 Zooj National award- Best Regional Film

1991 Phiringati National award- Second Best Film

1992 Saarathi National award- Best Regional Film

1993 Railor Alir Dubori Ban National award- Best Regional Film

1994 Aabartan National award- Best Regional Film

1995 Saagaraloi Bahu Door National award- Best Regional Film, GETZ Prize( 31st Chicago Interntnl. Film Festival ), Pri Do Public Award (Best Film:Nantes Film festival,France) 1996 Itihaas National award- Best Regional Film

1997 Adajjya National award- Best Regional Film & Jury's special award

1998 Kushal National award- Best Regional Film

1999 Pakhi National award- Best Regional Film

2002 Kanikar Ramdhenu National award- Best Regional Film

2003 Akashitarar Kathare National award- Best Regional Film

2003 Tora National award- Best Children Film

2004 Dinabandhu National award- Best Regional Film

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National & International Awards(Director, Music director...)

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1975 Dr. Bhupen Hazarika Best Music Director ("Chameli Memsaab") National Award

1985 Dr. Bhabendra Nath Saikia Best Screenplay("Agnisnan") National Award

1988 Indra Bania Best Actor ("Haaladhiya Charaye Bowdhan Khaai") Locarno Internatnl. Film Festival
1990 Gautam Bora Director's Best Debut Film ("Woshbipo") National Award- Indira Gandhi Award

1991 Moloya Goswami Best Actress ("Firingati") National Award

1993 Sanjeev Hazarika Director's Best Debut Film ("Haladhar") National Award- Indira Gandhi Award

1995 Jahnu Barua Best Director ("Sagaraloi Bahu Door") National Award

1995 Bishnu Khargharia Best Actor ("Sagaraloi Bahu Door" ) Singapore Internatnl. Film Festival

1996 Bidyut Chakraborty Director's Best Debut Film ("Raag Biraag") National Award- Indira Gandhi Award

1996 Srikar Prasad Best Editor ("Raag Biraag") National Award

2003 Tarali Sharma Best Playback Singer - female ("Akashitarar Kathare") National Award

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Chronology
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1930s
The origin of Assamese Cinema can be traced back to the dreams and imagination of a revolutionary visionary Rupkonwar Jyotiprasad Agarwala, who was also a distinguished poet, playwright, composer and freedom fighter. He was instrumental in the production of the first Assamese Film Joymati in 1935, under the banner of Critrakala Movietone. Due to the lack of trained technicians, Jyotiprasad, while making his maiden film, had to shoulder the added responsibilities as the script writer, producer, director, choreographer, editor, set and costume designer, lyricist and music director. The film, completed with a budget of 60,000 rupees was released on March 10, 1935. The picture failed miserably. It is unfortunate that like so many early Indian films , the negatives and complete prints of Joymati are missing. Some effort has been made privately by Altaf Mazid to restore and sub-title whatever is left of the prints.Despite the significant financial loss from Joymati the second picture Indramalati was filmed between 1937 and 1938 finally released in 1939.

1940s
Remaining strong in the face of adversity, Agarwala made another film after a lapse of two years titled Indramalati. It was his second and last film. The eminent composer and singer of Assam Bhupen Hazarika, played a stellar role in the play. With the passing away of Jyotiprasad, the Assamese film scene witnessed a temporary lull for about a couple of years. But things changed with the onset of World War II, Taking advantage of this, Rohini Kr. Baruah made a film on a relevant historical topic called Manomati in 1941. It was followed by films like Parvati Prasad Baruva's Rupahi (1946), Kamal Narayan Choudhury's Badan Barphukan (1947), Phani Sharma's Siraj, Asit Sen's Biplabi, Prabin Phukan's Parghat and Suresh Goswami's Runumi etc.

1950s

The most remarkable film of the fifties was Piyali Phukan which went on to win a National award. In 1955, a new talent Nip Barua made his directorial debut with Smrit Paras. His subsequent films Mak Aaru Moram and Ranga Police bagged many state awards and the silver medal at the national level. Bhupen Hazarika also produced and directed his first film Era Bator Sur. Prabhat Mukherjee made a film on the universality of mother-hood, Puberan (1959),which was shown in The Berlin Film Festival.

1960s

The next notable film production was Lachit Borphukan by Sarbeswar Chakraborty. Bhupen Hazarika made his unforgettable musical Shakuntala in 1961 which proved equally successful with critics and the press winning the president's silver medal. Following this, a chain of films went into regular production and got released which included Nip Barua's Narakasur, Anil Choudhury's Matri Swarga, Brojen Barua's Itu Situ Bahuto and Mukta & Anwar Hussain's Tejimala.

By the middle of the sixties, film began to be produced in Assam on a regular basis. However, between 1935 and 1970 a total of 62 films were produced. Besides the film makers already referred to, many others engaged in film making during the period included Pravin Sharma, Saila Barua, Abdul Mazid, Amar Pathak, Indukal Pattazarika, Diben Barua, Debkumar Basu, Amulya Manna, Gauri Barman, Atul Bardoloi, Sujit Singh, Nalin Duara and Prafulla Barua.

1970s

During the period of 1970-82 a total of 57 Assamese films were made. New directors started emerging on the horizon. Samarendra Narayan Deb's Aranya (1970), Kamal Choudhury's Bhaity (1972) the first colour film of Assam, Manoranjan Sur's Uttaran (1973), Deuti Barua's Bristi (1974) Pulok Gogoi's Khoj (1974) Padum Barua's Ganga Chilanir Pakhi (1976) and Dr. Bhabendranath Saikia's Sandhya Rag (1977) and Atul Bordoloi's Kollol (1978) are films worth - mentioning.
1980-

Notable directors of contemporary Assamese Cinema are Jahnu Baruah (who directed Aparoopa, Papori, Haladhia Choraye Baodhan Khai, Banani, Firingoti and Hkhagoroloi Bohu Door); Sanjeev Hazarika (Haladhar, Meemanxa) and Bhabendaranath Saikia who directed Anirbaan, Agnisnaan, Sarothi, Kolahol, Abartan, Itihaas and Kaal Sandhya). Other directors include Santwana Bordoloi who directed Adajya and Bidyut Chakraborty who made Rag Birag, both of which have won National & International Awards. Banani Banani is a village in Mali, populated by the Dogon people. ... Itihasa (Sanskrit: thus verily happened) refers collectively to the epic Hindu scriptures, detailing the actions of divine incarnations on earth while interspersing them with often large sections of philosophical and ethical discourse. ... Adajya is a 1996 Assamese language film directed by Santwana Bardoloi based on a novel by Indira Goswami. ...
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Personalities of Jollywood

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JYOTI PRASAD AGARWALA

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At the age of 14 in his student life he wrote the drama "Sonit-Kuwari" and between the age of 14 to 21 he also wrote many short stories. During his lifetime he had written drama, poetry, biography, books on children etc. He also delevered speeches in different functions on subjects like literature, music and culture.1934 -Constructed " Chitraban Studio" in Bholaguri Tea State temporarily and made the first Assamese movie "Joymati"1935- "Joymati" was released1936-37 - Produced jointly with Bishnu Prasad Rabha the record play "Joymati" and "Sonit Kunwari"1937 - Constructed Jonaki cinema hall in Tezpur.1939 - Made the second Assamese movie Indra Malati even before the stipulated time.1940 - Established Tezpur music school. He republished "Asomiya" which was a closed down newspaper since 1944 (for seven months).Was a pioneer in establishing an University in Assam, and also prepared a architectural print for the construction of University.


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Dr. Bhupen Hazarika

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Bhupen Hazarika is ranked amongst the leading film maker of the nation. He is probably the only living pioneer who is solely responsible for placing the fledging Assamese cinema all over India and also on the world cinema map. He has been the only person in the past 40 years to propagate for a better cinema movement and has integrated all the seven north-eastern states, including the tribal culture and traditions,through the medium of cinema. His remarkable popularity brought him to the legislative Assembly as an Independent member between 1967 to 1972, where he was solely responsible for installing the first state owned film studio of its kind ever, in India in Guwahati, Assam.

Bhupen Hazarika began his career in films as a child actor in the second talkie file to be made in the pioneering years of 1939 in the film "Indramalati". A prodigy whose genius was acknowledged from a very early age he wrote and sang his first song at the age of 10 after which there has been no looking back. He has produced , directed, composed the background score and also featured on the tracks for the films "Era Bator Sur" in 1956, "Shakuntala" in 1960, "Pratidhwani" in 1978 , "Loti Ghoti" in 1967, "Chick Mick Bijuli" in 1971, "Mon Projapati" in 1978, "Swikarokti" in 1986, "Siraj" in 1988. He also directed , composed music and sang for "Mahut Bandhure" in 1958. He produced, directed and composed music for Arunachal Pradesh's first Hindi feature film in color "Mera Dharam Meri Maa" in 1977. He directed a color documentary for the Arunachal Pradesh Government on Tribal folk songs and dances entitled "For Whom The Sun Shines" in 1974.

He produced and directed a documentary "Emuthi Saular Kahini" based on the co-operative movement for the Govt. of Assam entirely in a lyrical format. He produced and directed a half-hour documentary for Calcutta Doordarshan Kendra in 1977 on the folk songs and dances of north east India entitled "Through Melody and Rhythm", he produced and composed music for five reeler color documentary to promote tourism for the Govt. of Assam in 1981. He produced and composed music for the internationally acclaimed award winning Hindi feature film "Ek Pal" in 1986, directed by Kalpana Lajmi, starring Shabana Azmi, Nasiruddin Shah, Faroque Shaikh. He produced and composed the music for the extremely popular television serial "Lohit Kinare" directed by Kalpana Lajmi based on famous short stories of Assam for the prime time National Network in 1988. He has been the Executive Producer as also the Music Composer for the recent award winning film in Hindi "Rudali" starring Dimple Kapadia, Raj Babbar, Amjad Khan and Rakhi.

He has won the President's National Award for the best film maker thrice: for "Shakuntala", "Pratidhwani", and "Loti Ghoti" in 1960, 1964 and 1967 respectively. He won the Arunachal Pradesh Government's Gold Medal in 1977 for his outstanding contribution towards Tribal Welfare, and Upliftment of Tribal Culure through cinema and music composer in India in 1977 for the Assamese film "Chameli Memsaab".

Dr. Bhupen Hazarika has been the Chairman, Eastern Region on the Appellate Body of the Central Board of the Central Boad of Film Censors, Government of India for 9 yrs. consecutively till 1990.

He is on the Script Committee of the National Film Development Corporation, Eastern India.

He is the director on the national level on the Board of Directors of National Film Development Corporation, Government of India.

He was the Executive Council Member of the Children Film Society (N'CYP) headed by Mrs. Jaya Bachchan . He is the member of the Board of Trustees for the Poor Artists Welfare Fund, Government of India. He was the Chairman of the Jury of the National Film Awards in 1985 to 1990. he is at present also on the Governing Council for policy making decisions for the Film and Television Institute, Government of India, Pune.

The information and Broadcasting Ministry, Government of India bestowed the honor of Producer Emeritus on him.

Bhupen Hazarika was also a member of P.C.Joshi Committee appointed by the Information Ministry for revitalizing software programming through television for the coming 21st century.

He has rendered music in outstanding Bengali films, such as "Jiban Trishna", "Jonkir Alo", "Mahut Bandhure", "Kari o Komal", "Asamapta", "Ekhane Pinjar", "Dampati", "Chameli Memsaab", "Dui", "Bechara", and Hindi films like "Arop", "Ek Pal", and "Rudaali". He has in 1995 given music for Sai Paranjype's Hindi feature film "Papiha" and Bimal Dutta's Hindi feature film "Pratimurti".
In 1996 he has composed music for Plus Channel's Hindi feature film "Mil Gayee Manzil Mujhe" directed by Lekh Tandon starring Meenakshi Sheshadri.

In 1996 he has also composed for Plus Channel's Hindi feature film "Saaz" directed by Sai Paranjype starring Shaban Azmi.

In 1996 he has composed music for Pan Pictures Hindi feature film "Darmiyaan" starring Kiron Kher and Tabu directed and written by Kalpana Lajmi.

In 1998 he has composed music for Hindi feature film "Gajagamini" written and directed by eminent painter Mr. M.F.Hussain.

He had produced a 52 episodes tele serial titled "Dawn" for telecast on Star TV, The serial casts Shabana Aazmi, Mona Ambegaonkar, Deepa Lagoo, Tom Alter and others.

He has also produced another 18 part documentary entitled "Glimpses of the Misty East" on the soio economic and cultural progress in North Eastern India from 1947 to 1997 , assigned to him by the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Govt. of India for celebration of Fifty years of India's independence. In 2000 he has composed music for Hindi feature film "Daman" and had written the story of the film "Chingaari" directed by Ms. Kalpana Laajmi.

ACHIEVEMENTS IN MUSIC AND CULTURE :

He is considered today the last of the great mass singers and the only great ballad singer alive in India. Involved in the Indian movement from his very childhood, till today he writes and composes masterpieces teaming with social consciousness which are in striking contrast to his famous love songs. besides being associated with films, Bhupen Hazarika has won the hearts of the entire Indian people through his discs through which he has rendered some of his finest compositions.
For Bhupen Hazarika music has always been his first love. He met Paul Robson with whom he became closely associated between 1949 and 1955 in USA. It was during this period he was awarded a Gold Medallion in New York as the best interpreter of India's folk songs by Eleanor Roosevelt.Bhupen Hazarika sings in numerous languages but writes his lyrics and poems in his home language, Assamese.

Bhupen Hazarika has rightly been hailed as India's Cultural Ambassador abroad for placing the folk music of Eastern India on the map of world folk music. He has traveled widely as a Delegate to Conferences on Mass Communication, Poetry, Music, Performing Arts and Cinema from the Belgium Congo to Samarkand, from the Mississipi to Danube, to Europe, Canada, South-East Asia, Japan, USA, UK, and Australia.
He represented India in Berlin at the World Conference of Composers who used songs as an instrument in social change. He was given the honor of inaugurating the World seminar in congress Hall with his own songs on the liberation of Bangladesh.
Bhupen Hazarika's popularity is so tremendous as performing artist,that for the last 50 years he has been the biggest crowd puller and was honored for the Golden Jubilee of his singing career in 1991.

HONOURS CONFERRED:

The country bestowed its greatest honor on him, the Padamshree in 1977 for outstanding contribution to the field of culture in India.
In 1977 he won two awards in West Bengal. The Bangla Chalachitra Prasar Samity and the Bangla Chalchitra Purashkar Samity for being the best music director of the film 'Dampati". In 1978 he won two awards from Bangladesh Journalists Association and the Bangladesh film industry.
The Gramophone Company of India bestowed on him the Gold Disc for his outstanding contribution towards Indian Music in 1978.
In 1979 and 1980 he won the Ritwick Ghatak Award as best music directors for two theatre plays "Mohua Sundari" and "Nagini Kanyar Kahini".
In 1979 he won the All India Critic Association Award for the best performing folk artist in India.
In 1987 he was conferred the National Citizen's Award at New Delhi for his outstanding excellence in music.

Indian cinemas most coveted DadaSaheb Phalke award winner, Dr. Bhupen Hazarika is a man of deep heart. His personality as a music creator suppressed his identity as a able film maker. He had made seven films in Assamese language alone. Even on behalf of the Government of Arunachal Pradesh he made a Hindi film namely “Marii Dharam Meri Maa”. Apart from these he was the music director of Assamese films like “ Piyali Phukan” (1954), “Dhumuha” (1957), “ Kencha Son”, (1959), “Maniram Dewan” (1963), “Khoj” (1975), “ Kanchghar” (1975), “Cameli Memsaab”, (1975), “Palasar Rang” (1976), “Ban Hansa”, (1977), “Banjui” (1978), “ Akan” (1980), “Aparupa”, (1982), “Angikaar” (1985), “ Sankalpa” (1986), “Maa” (1986), “Yuge Yuge Sangram” (1986), “Pratisodh” (1987), “Priyajan” (1993), “Paani” (1995) and a Bora film “Cmimang” (1987). As music director he directed 27 films of Assam. For his contribution to Assamese film he received Dada Saheb Phalke Award. As director before selecting a theme for his film Dr. Hazarika critically examined the theme. While the story of Assamese film was based on historical and mythological events Dr. Hazarika made “Era Batar Sur” a totally musical film. In this film we see the hero roams around the cities in search of musical notes. Dr. Hazarika was also inspired by the Neo-realism trend started in Italy. This film reflected his feelings nicely. He made “Pratiddhani” in 1963. In this film the relation between the people of hilly region and those of valley became the central thing; but still it reveals a nice love story. With Manik Raytang he made the screen play on a Khasi folklore. His another film “lati Ghati” (1966) is a film made in trend of film within film. Probably the audience at that time could not understand properly the sharp satirical tone which is why the film was not well accepted. Brajen Baruah’s “Ito Sito Bahuto” is another such film. That is why both the films can be called as the films ‘Ahead of Time’. The “Chik Mik Bijuli” (1969) is a film where Dr. Hazarika pictures the life style of lower class people in the society. Similarly in “Man Prajapati” he pictured the life style of some people who worked in a circus party. Dr. Hazarika is a man master of many fields. For him songs are his life and the lyrics and its tune are his breathed air. That is why even though he thought about making films; still he could not work on it strictly because he probably did not have so much patience and time to spare for making a film. That is why he became much interested in music direction rather than film making. He was such a careless artist for his future that he even neglected the offer of India’s prestigious ‘Rajasree Production’; who offered him to make five films serially. But Dr. Hazarika did not bother to go ahead after making the first film. Later he was closely in link with films but retired from film direction. As music director, he even created history in Hindi film industry also.

The Films Of Dr. Bhupen Hazarika are:

1. Era Batar Sur 1956 Director/ Music Director
2. Shakuntala 1961 Director/ Music Director
3. Pratiddhani 1964 Director/ Music Director
4. Lati Ghati 1966 Director/ Music Director
5. ChikMik Bijuli 1969 Director/ Music Director
6. Man Prajapati 1979 Director/ Music Director
7. Shiraj 1988 Director/ Music Director

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Dr. Bhabendra Nath Saikia
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The one name that coinsures up a feeling of warmth in every Assamese heart is that of Dr. Bhabendra Nath Saikia. His gift to the Assamese Society and in the fields of art., culture and literature has not yet been adequately measured. A very capable student of Physics and successful teacher of Gauhati University, Dr. Saikia entered the arena of literature with a few short stories that have shaken the very foundation of the form & style of Assamese fiction. With an eye to very minute details he used his pen with a depth surgeon’s precision. That was a unique beauty of his literary creations.His creativity is such that he was always found at the head of a line of stalwarts in his own field. Dr. Saikia with a handful of very distinct few of his age group, has taken Assamese literature to a very respectable height and in the process a horde of awards came his away. What is remarkable in his case is that the discerning people of Assam have lost count of the awards but have kept close to their heart his works like "SHRINGKHAL", "BANAPRASTHA," "GAHBAR", "ANTAREEP" and the like. Added to this glorious creations, Dr. Saikia has made his way to a totally different field,namely of films. Someone has said about Dr. Saikia that he has a "Midas Touch" in whatever he puts his hand on. As if to prove this, he has directed such remarkable films like "SANDHYARAAG", "AGNISHNAN", " KOLAHAL", " SARATHI", and "KAALSANDHYA". Each & everyone of his films received not only rave reviews but also recognition both in the country and abroad. An important point to be noted that all his films were based on his own literary creations. One good aspect of this transformation is that he could translate every bit of his literary details to celluloid. These achievements, it is needless to say, have done us proud.Dr Saikia has also put his hand & heart in the publication of few prestigious journals, the most popular "PRANTIK" is one with which he was associated from the very start. A children’s journal "SOFURA" discontinued for sometime, but has started again under his able leadership. Readers of "PRANTIK" will agree, that Dr. Saikia has given the journal a very respectable look not only its presentation but also in the variety and depth of its contents.Dr. Saikia’s creativity found other equally successful outlets. His radio plays are one. More particularly a few he created for children has not been bettered as yet by other similar creations. He has also given a status to the most famous trend in Assamese Theatre, Namely Mobile Theatre. A hitherto unknown trend was established by a few such theatrical group with very rich plays and appropriate directional touch by him.Dr. Saikia’s outstanding creations, be in celluloid or in the stage, have as yet achieved a landmark. They have given audiences a taste of the medias and people have learnt to appreciate a good film or a good play.It is our pleasure to present this wonderful personality to this select group of people here today and through them to the society at large.

Dr. Bhabendra Nath Saikia's films are:



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JAHNU BARUAH

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Internationally acclaimed Filmmaker Jahnu Baruah have made the following Films

Har Pal (2007)
Maine Gandhi Ko Nahin Mara (2005)
Tora (2004) aka Tora's Love (International: English title)
Konikar Ramdhenu (2003) aka Ride on the Rainbow (International: English title)
Pokhi (2000) ... aka And the River Flows
Kuhkhal (1998)...aka The Price of Freedom
Xagoroloi Bohu Door (1995) aka It's a Long Way to the Sea
Firingoti (1992) aka The Spark
Banani (1990) aka The Forest
Adhikar (1988) TV Series aka Right
Halodhia Choraye Baodhan Khai
Ek Kahani (1986) (TV) aka One Story
Papori (1986)
Apeksha (1984)
Aparoopa (1982)
and has won the following various awards at national and international level.Fribourg International Film Festival, Audience Award and Award of the Pestalozzi Children's Village Foundation for: Hkhagoroloi Bohu Door (1995)Locarno International Film Festival Prize of the Ecumenical Jury - Special Mention and Silver Leopard for: Halodhia Choraye Baodhan Khai (1987)

** National award- Best Children Film for Tora 2003

** National award- Best Regional Film for Kushal (1998), Kanikar Ramdhenu (2002) and Aparupa(1982)

** National award- Best Regional Film, GETZ Prize( 31st Chicago Interntnl. Film Festival ), Pri Do Public Award (Best Film:Nantes Film festival,France) for Saagaraloi Bahu Door (1995)

** National award- Second Best Film for Phiringati (1991)

** National award- Best Film, Second Best Film ( Locarno Interntl. Film Festival ) and Swarn Kamal award for Haaladhiya Charaye Bawdhan Khaai 1987

“Maine Gandhi Ko Nahin Mara” bagged three awards at the Riverside International Film Festival in California best film, best actor and audience choice at the festival

Jahnu Barua (born in Assam) graduated in Science from Guwahati University with a Diploma in Cinema (Film Direction) from Film & TV Institute India, Pune. He worked as a television producer in Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) under Satellite Instructional Television Expert (SITE) scheme and made several educational television science programmes for rural school children. He produced and directed many short films beforestepping into making feature films.Nine times National Award winner, Jahnu Barua got major national as well as international rdrecognition through his 3 film `Halodhia Charaye Baodhan Khai' (The Catastrophe) that won the National Award for the Best Film (Golden Lotus) in 1988 and several international recognitions including the Grand Prix Silver Leopard and World Ecumenical Award at the Locarno International Film Festival, Best Film at Amien International Film Festival, and Best of Asia at the Tokyo International Film Festival. Another notable film `Hkhagoroloi Bohudoor' (It's a Long Way to the Sea) also won the National Award for the Best Director (Golden Lotus) in 1995, and 15 international awards including World Peace Prize at Chicago International Film Festival, and Best Director at the International Film Festival of Independent Film Makers at Brussels, apart from being invited to as many as 42 prestigious film festivals world wide in a span of two years. His latest film `Maine Gandhi Ko Nahi Mara' (Hindi) is contemporarily one of the most critically acclaimed films. In 2003, he was conferred the Padma Shri by the President of India and the Kamal Kumari National Award for Culture in 2004.

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Zubeen Garg
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Zubeen had won GIFA award and Stardust Award in Bollywood as playback singer for the song "Ya Ali" in the movie "Gangster".

Jollywood Career : As an actor:
'Tumi Mor Matho Mor', 'Dinabandhu', 'Mon Jaai', & about 5 video films, Teleplays.

As a Director: 'Tumi Mor Matho Mor'.. As Music Director: 'Hiya Diya Niya', 'Tumi Mor Matho Mor', 'Daag', 'Naayak', 'Prem Aru Prem', 'Jonaki Mon', 'Kanyadaan', 'Jiban Nadir Duti Paar', 'Agnisaakshi', 'Priya Milan', 'Bidhata', 'Juman Suman','Maaya', 'Baarud', 'Rang', 'Dinabandhu', 'Adhinaayak','Ami Asomiya', 'Mon Jaai'.
As Playback Singer: 'Hiya Diya Niya', 'Tumi Mor Matho Mor', 'Daag','Naayak', 'Prem Aru Prem', 'Jonaki Mon', 'Kanyadaan', 'Jiban Nadir Duti Paar', 'Agnisaakshi', 'Priya Milan', 'Bidhata', 'Juman Suman','Maaya', 'Baarud', 'Rang', 'Dinabandhu', 'Adhinaayak','Ami Asomiya', 'Mon Jaai', 'Asene Konoba Hiyaat' etc..
Solo Albums:
'Anamika', 'Maaya', 'Sabda', 'Jantra', 'Unmona Mon', 'Mukha', 'Barashun', 'Mukti', 'Shishu' , 'Asha', 'Paakhi' etc.. Bollywood Career :
As Music Director: 'Strings'.
As Playback Singer: 'Fiza', 'Gangster', 'Desh Mil Gaya', 'Pyar ka side effects', 'Kaise Kahoo', 'Bas Ek Pal', 'Woh Lamhe' , 'Big Brother','I see You' , 'Strings' etc..

Theatre:
As Director: Abahan.
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MOLOYA GOSWAMI
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Career As Artist:
Associated with more than 40 plays broadcasted by AIR, Guwahati.Acted in more than 25 stage plays.First appearance in the lead role of "Menaka" in Dr. Bhabendra Nath Saikia's film "Agnisnan". The film was awarded the Best Screen Play Award in the National Film Festival.Acted in "Maa", "I Killed Him Sir", "Aasene Konoba Hiyaat", "Sesh Upahaar" etc.
Awarded "Rajat Kamal" for Best Actress in 1992 for the film "Firingoti" directed by Jahnu Baruah.Acted in 10-15 teleserials and 9 telefilms.
Important Post Held:
Selected as Jury Members for Feature Films by Directorate of Film Festivals twice- in 1994 and 2000.
Ex- executive member of North East Zone Cultural Centre(NEZCC).
Presently member of Executive Body of East Zone Cultural Centre, Calcutta.
Member of Drama Selection Committee of Sankardeva Kalakshetra.
Executive member of Jyoti Chitraban Film Society.
Ex-member of State Level Integration Committee, Govt. of Assam.
Additional:Recitation of Assamese poems
Directed a recitation of Cassette "Mondakini" comprising self recitation of Assamese poems by renowned poets e.g. Sri Nava Kanta Baruah, Hiren Bhattacharya, Ajit Baruah, Keshab Mahanta and others.
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Seema Biswas
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Seema Biswas is an Assamese actress who shot into prominence with the role of Phoolan Devi in Shekhar Kapur's film Bandit Queen (1994). Seema Biswas was born on January 14, 1965 in Guwahati, Assam, to Jagdish and Meera Biswas. Her mother was a history teacher and a pioneering figure for female theater artistes in Assam, an early influence; and she came into contact with artists like Bhupen Hazarika, Phani Sarma and Bishnuprasad Rabha early in life. She took to theater at a tender age. She studied Political Science at Nalbari College, and later joined the National School of Drama at Delhi. After completing her studies at NSD, she joined the NSD Repertory Company. She staged a performance of a play titled Khubsurat Bahu (NSD Repertory Company) following which Shekhar Kapur offered her a role in Bandit Queen. Although she had earlier acted in Assamese cinema this was her first big break into Hindi cinema, and she arrived with a bang.Biswas won the 1996 National Film Award for Best Actress for her role in the film. She has a reputation for performing strong character roles.Biswas won the 2006 Best Actress Genie Award for her role as Shakuntala in Deepa Mehta's Water (2005).Rooted firmly in theatre, she refuses to be typecast, and have worked in a variety of films and character roles. She has also worked in a number of Malayalam, and a Tamil film.

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Nipon Goswami

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A versatile actor, Nipon Goswami had acted in the following movies,

'Sangram', 'Dr. Bezbaruah', 'Baruar Sansar', 'Mukuta', 'Maanab Aru Daanab''Shesh Bichar', 'Morisika', 'Abhijaan', 'Santaan', 'Aashray', 'Meghamukti', 'Dooronir Rang', 'Aajoli Nobou', 'Man aru Maram', 'Aparupa', 'Ghar Sansar','Kakadeuta Naati Aru Haati', 'Nayanmani', 'Jiban Surabhi', 'Shakuntala AruSankar Joseph Ali', 'Pooja', 'Aarati', 'Maa', 'Deepjyoti', 'Protishodh','Pratima''Pratidaan', 'Siraaj', 'Aai Mor Janame Janame', 'Ranganadi', 'Deutar Biya','Baibhav', 'Jon Jale Kapalat', 'Prem Aru Prem', 'Kakadeutar Ghar Jowai', 'Kadambari', 'Deuta Diya Bidaay' etc.. & about 60 video films, short films,Teleplays.

he had also directed the movie Pratima with Munin Baruah.

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Munin Baruah

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Munin Baruah started his film career way back in the mid seventies as a screenplay writer and Assistant Director. He has written 21 feature films till date. Notable among them are “Bowari”, “Sonmaina”(winner of national award), “Daag”, “Barood”, “Rang”, “Maya”, “Bidhata”, “Dinabandhu” etc.As a director he created some critically acclaimed films like “Pita Putra”, “pahari Kanya”, “ Prabhati Pakhir Gaan”, “Hiya Diya Niya”, “Nayak”, “Kanyadan”, “’Bidhata”, “Rang”, “Barood”, “Dinabandhu etc.As a playwright he wrote more than 50 plays for the mobile theatre groups of Assam. ‘Aghaat’, ‘Kaal Shankha’, ‘Sadagar’, ‘Sriman Srimati’, ‘Son Sara Sapon’, ‘Chiriyakhana’, ‘Jay Parajay’, Surya Putra Karna’, ‘Rudra’ are some of his famous plays.He has directed sponsored TV serial ‘Papu Niku Sambad’ and Telefilm ‘Rudra’ telecast by Door Darshan Kendra , Guwahati.AwardAchievements:He won awards like State Award for Best Director ('Nayak', 2001-02), Best Film ('Barood', 2003-04) and National Award for “Dinabandhu” (Best Regional Film).

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BIJU PHUKON

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A versatile actor in Jollywood, Bipu Phukon acted in the following movies,

Dr. Bezbaruah, Aaranya,Bonoriya Phool, Ghar Sansar, Bowari, Raja, Upapath, Pita-Putra. Agnisnan,Papori, Aparupa,I Killed Him Sir,Eai Morom Tumar Babe,Aasene Konoba Hiyaat
Brishti,Hepaah,Baarud,Deuta Diya Bidaay, Ganesh, Itihaas etc

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Pranjal Saikia
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Another prolific play and cinema actor, Pranjal Saikia acted in the following movies

Faaguni
Upapath
Aajoli Naubo
Koka Deuta-Naaati aaru Haati
Priyajan
Xun Moina
Puja
Xuraj
Aei Dex Mur Dex
Pratima
Sankalpa
Mon-Mondir
Pratidaan
Pita-Putra
Mayuri
Bhai-bhai
Halodia Saraye Bao Dhan Khaye
Pahaadi Kanya
Probhati Pokhir Gaan
Urbakhi
Paani
Joubane Aamoni Kore
Raag-biraag
Hiya Diya Niya
Anal
Daag
Anya Ek Jaatra
Naayak
** Acted in "YATRA" a tele serial directed by Shyam Bengal .Participated in a number of T.V.Programmes with D.D.K.Guwahati,Assam
**Directed And Produced Three Tele-Films:
ANYA EK ADHYAI (in Assamese) for D.D.K.,GuwahatiWriter:Sree Arun Sarmah(The renowned playwright,literary figure,Recipient Of Sangeet Natak Academy Award. Ex-Director,A.I.R.)
ANYA EK ADHYAI (in Hindi) For Doordarshan Kendra Delhi
ALI DOMOZAT (in Assamese)Writer:Mahendra Borthakur

he has also acted in various plays internationally.

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Tapan Das

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Jollywood Career:
As Actor: 'Sendoor', 'Shakuntala Aru Sankar Joseph Ali', 'Suruj', 'Pooja', 'Shankalpa','Sutrapaat', 'Pita Putra', 'Abhimaan', 'Pahaari Kanya', 'Drishti', 'Prabhati Pakhir Gaan','Pratyabartan', 'Abartan', 'Itihaas', 'Krishnasura', 'Daag', 'Gun Gun Gaane Gaane', 'Baarud', 'Dinabandhu', 'Anuraag', 'Chakravyuh', 'Antaheen Jaatra', 'Aghari Atma', 'Astaraag' etc.

Theatre:
As an Actor & Director: Shakuntala , Bordoisila, Kohinoor.

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Abdul Mazid

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Career:

As director:
Maram Trishna 1965
Chameli Memsaab 1975
Banahangsa 1977
Banjui 1978
Ponakan 1983
Uttarkaal 1999

He also wrote the screen play of the above mentioned films.Documentory Films: Puppet Dance of assam, Azan Fakir, Bahadur Gaonburha, Music & Dances of Goalpara, Rituals, Customs & Culture of the Rabhas of Assam, Ujani Asomar Dhulia Ojha, Retuals, tTraditions & Culture of Nath-Jogi Community of Bilashipara region.TV Serials and Telefilms : “NaamGhariya”, “Ajaga”, “Jor Puri Haat”, “Dapon” (two episodes), “Agnigarbha”, (on DDk Dibrugarh), “Hatora”, “Segun Puli Ruba Kone”, “ram-Rahim”, “Romanthan”.

Achievements:Awards:

Asom sahitya Sabha Award for drama “Chor” in the year 1966-67.
Awarded Best Director in Multi lingual Drama Competition held at New Delhi in 1971.
Chameli Memsaab won the National Award “ Rajat Kamal” in the 23rd National Film Festival, as the best film in assamese Language.
Won the best Director Award for the year 1988-1992 of Assamese TV serial “Namghariya”, by Silpi Divas Samiti.

Bishnu Prasad Rabha Award For the year 1986, by Govt. of Assam.

Natsurya Award in1999.

As Dramatist : Some of his popular dramas are “Banchita”, “Dhooli-Makati”, “ Chor”, “Sampurna Mahabharat”, “Sihat Aahishe” etc.

s an actor: He acted more than 38 films in various roles.

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Arun nath

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As Actor: "Dooronir Rang", "Bahaagar Duporia", "Agnisnan", "Pratidaan", "Kolahal","Dhrubatora", "Rangaa Madaar", "Bangsadhar", "Prabhati Pakhir Gaan", "Saarathi","Pratyabartan", "Agnigarh", "Saagaraloi Bahudoor", "Imaan Maram Kiyo Laage","Kanyadaan", "Priya-O-Priya", "Bidhata", "Dinabandhu", "The Sixth Day of Creation",etc..

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BIDYA RAO

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Jollywood Career ( As Actor ):

'Latighati', 'Mukuta', 'Sangram', 'Maanab Aru Daanab', 'Aranya', 'Sonma', 'Niyati', 'Ajali Nobou', 'Moinajan', 'Manashi', 'Sri Sri Maa Kamakhya', 'Ghar Sansar', 'Nayanmoni', 'Jiban Surabhi', 'Sendoor', 'Shesh Bichar', 'Pratiddhani', 'Shakuntala', 'Chikmik Bijuli', 'Saarathi', 'Hridayar Are Are', 'Urbashi', 'Devata', 'Baibhav' etc.

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MRIDULA BARUAH

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Jollywood Career (As Actor): 'Bhai Bhai', 'Kanyadaan', 'Baarud' , 'Ahir Bhairav' ,'Bowari', 'Meghamukti', 'Marami', 'Upapath', 'Ponakan', 'Kakadeuta, Nati Aru Haati', 'Shakuntala Aru Sankar Joseph Ali', 'Bahaagar Dupariya', 'Aarati', 'Maa', 'Deepjyoti', 'Pratima', 'Siraaj', 'Ajala Kakai', 'Bardoisila', 'Ranganadi', 'Drishti', 'Prabhati pakhir gaan', 'Saarathi', 'Priyajan', 'Pratyabartan', 'Aabartan', 'I killed Him Sir', 'Itihaash', 'Sanghaat Sanghaat Sanghaat' , 'Baibhav', 'Hiya Diya Niya', 'Tumi Mor Matho Mor', 'Asene konoba Hiyaat', 'Shesh Upahaar', 'Anya Ek Jaatra', 'Aei Morom Tomar Babe', 'Imaan Morom Kiyo Laage', 'Zakham', 'Gun Gun Gaane Gaane', 'Priyamilan', 'Bidhata', 'Aeiyei Jonak Biheen Jiban', 'Hepaah', 'Maa Tumi Ananya', 'Kadambari', 'Astaraag', 'Snehabandhan' etc. & about 30 video films, teleplays.

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PURABI SHARMA

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She had acted in various roles in the following films:

'Ajali Nobow','Pratham Raagini', 'Pita Putra', 'Bhai Bhai', 'Pooja', 'Ashanta- -Prahar', 'Kanyadaan', 'Ahir Bhairav', 'Baarud', 'Mrityunjoy' , 'Son Moina', 'Sankalpa',''Antony Mor Naam' , 'Sewali', 'Abhimaan', 'Paahari Kanya', 'Bidhata'.


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JATIN BORA

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As an actor:Uttarkal, I killed him sir , kalsandhya(hindi) , hiya diya niya, ahankar, tumi mor matho mor, daag, shesh upahaar, anya ek jaatra, koina mor dhunia, Aei morom tomar babei, naayak, prem aru prem, kanyadaan, priya O' priya, jiwan nadir duti paar, Tyaag, mitha mitha laganat, Aeyei jonak bihin jiwan, premgeet, agnisakshi, priyamilan, bidhata, juman suman, hepaah, maa tumi ananya, juiye pora xoun, hriday kapowa gaan, baarud, kadambari, rang, suren sorar putek, senai mor dhulia, aghari atma, adhinayak, dinabandhu, deuta diya bidaay, dhunia tirotabor, borola sanxar & supta krandan.
As a Director: Adhinaayak.
As an Actor in TV Serial:
Deuta , Naamgharia, Aei Saharate, Sandhyatara, Birina patar aarate etc..
As an Actor & Director in Theatre:
Aabahan, hengul, ashirbaad, bhagyadevi, kohinoor.

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PRASTUTI PARASHAR

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She had acted in the following serials and movies

Serials: Barnali, Nisar Nayak, Chakrabehu, Mahanagarh, Jonakat Siharan

Movies: Maharathi,Tumi more mathu more, Asene Kunuba Hiyat, Priya O Priya, Aai Maram Tumar Babe, Gun Gun Gane Gane,Jakham, Prem Aru Prem, Jivan Nabir Duti Par , Dinabandhu , Rang etc.



5 comments:

Souvik Chatterji said...

Balraj Sahani is one of the most gifted character actors of bollywood films of 50s, 60s and 70s. He performance used to be absolutely natural, without mannerisms. He was sublime in his performance in Do Bigha Zameen,

Jharna said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jharna said...

Can you please make the songs(assamese) of Bhagya(the 1st movie to be dubbed in assamese) available in this site?

Ashish said...

Hi Mofid... Ive met you in Assam history community of Orkut before.

Well, can u please put up in your wonderful blog, the details of Kapil Bora's cinema and his personal life too?

Bye,
Ashish Bhattacharyya

reshma M said...
This comment has been removed by the author.